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Poet Alok Vaid-Menon charms audience in reading for the Voices of Color Lecture Series

Alok Vaid-Menon wore an absolutely gorgeous outfit for their reading ––a pretty floral dress and fabulous teal platform heels, paired with a bold white lip. Their hair gleamed. In the shifting reds and yellows of the spotlight, they put on a truly spectacular show with nothing but their voice and an incredible towering charisma that had the entire audience enthralled. At the end of the show, we all rose as one to give a raucous standing ovation the likes of which the Fillius Events Barn only sees once every while.  More ...

Weldon focuses on promising music career after medical scare

Watching House or Scrubs, I feel as though I’ve become familiar with hospital terms and the disasters that can occur—comas, coding, crash carts and charts fill the subtitles, but the reality of these experiences escaped me. What does it mean for someone to go into a coma or require a crash cart? Musician and actor Julia Weldon recently found out for themselves.  Performing in the Fillius Events Barn on Oct. 17, Weldon followed a student opener, Aaron Collins ’19. Beginning with songs from their previous album, “Light is a Ghost,” they mentioned briefly the financial setback to their plans to release a new album this year—a coma. Strikingly, Weldon managed to relay this information while maintaining the tone of a conversation.  More ...

The Mowgli’s perform impressive, energetic show for Fall CAB Concert

Hamilton was in for a treat on Friday night, Nov. 11, with a concert presented by the Campus Activities Board (CAB). The Mowgli’s were in town and rocked Tolles Pavilion. The sextet from Los An- geles––consisting of singer Katie Jayne Earls, guitarists Colin Louis Dieden and Josh Hogan, bassist Matthew Di Panni, keyboardist Dave Appelbaum and per- cussionist Andy Warren––are known for their sunny, feel-good, anthemic indie rock brand of music. On Friday they were joined by opening act Vinyl Theatre, another indie rock outfit from Milwaukee comprised of drummer Nick Cesarz, singer and guitarist Keegan Calmes and keyboardist Chris Senner. More ...

Rita Lombardi’s work examining the reading experience on display at local art institute

On Libraries, a current exhibition at the Munson Williams Proctor Arts Insti- tute in Utica, explores the values reading adds to our lives. The exhibition opened last October and will remain on  view  until  April  2017. Artist Rita Lombardi composed On Libraries from a series of photographs she took of different sections in libraries, such as corners, gates and outside views, around the nation. Through her skillfully taken photographs, Lombardi urges viewers to contemplate their reading ex- perience at different libraries.   More ...

Hedda Gabbler opens with electrifying exploration of freedom and gender

Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler is considered one of the most prolific female characters in modern drama. On the outside, Hedda is sharp, poised and biting, yet on the inside, she is stubborn, complex and incredibly bored. Catherine Daigle ’17 brings incredible life and nuance to the character in the Hamilton Theatre Department’s Fall Mainstage, Hedda Gabler. Her hard work and dedication to the role is apparent to anyone who attends the production, even as she, at only 21, plays a character considered to be the height of many actors’ careers.  More ...

Hamilton faculty and students fill Events Barn for Vuong’s poetry reading

Ocean Vuong came to Hamilton College on a shockingly warm day in November when we all got an extra hour of sleep and believed in our own progress, and in democracy in general. Daylight Savings quickly turned the bright day soft and vaguely purple, and it was in this stillness that Vuong entered the DMC living room for a preliminary craft talk (Vuong once compared the dusk to a strip of honey between two shadows, draining). Vuong talked for a long time, in a gentle and insistent murmur, and when people started asking questions, they couldn’t help but moderate their voices to match the volume of his near-whisper. What a lovely cadence to imitate! It is soft and sudden. The man who came with Vuong sat in the back of the room, wearing a leather jacket, eyes intent on Vuong’s face. More ...

Clinton Fine Arts and Crafts Festival both over- and underwhelms

   The Clinton Fine Arts and Crafts Festival, held both days last weekend in the gymnasium, faculty break room and hallways of Clinton High School, was utterly nightmarish when viewed from a certain angle. Well. From multiple angles, and all of them sober.  According to FestivalNet, a sort of online guidebook for festivals in the States and Canada, there were some 75 exhibitors displaying their wares. Yet, there could have been twice that number for all I knew. Of the  homemade goods and gifts peddled by the elderly merchants, there was nothing if not a bumper crop: delicate-looking aprons of faux-gilt, wooden picture frames, scarves, cotton candy made in blue and pink tubs, holiday-inflected ornaments, towels and painted wood -carvings, soap from lye, soap from goat’s milk, gratis maple syrup like wet amber in bendy plastic cups, topaz necklaces and purity rings, afghans overgrown with daisies and, providing token anti-establishment appeal under a canopy tent in the corner of the gymnasium, tie-dye shirts stiff on hangers and curled over clothing racks.  More ...

White earns hearty laughs

Comedians Neko White and Phill Hunt came to campus last Saturday night, giving a genuinely memorable, hilarious performance. I’ve only been to a few comedy shows here, but I can say with confidence that this was my favorite.  After a promising debut from student comedian Anna Maglio ’18, Phill Hunt took the stage. His slow, careful delivery made for an interesting contrast to Maglio’s nervous energy. His style is basically in the tradition of classic observational comedy, covering a wide range of topics. He plucks situations from life we’ve all experienced before (restaurant bathroom signs reminding employees to wash their hands, depressing bus rides) and displays them in all of their absurd glory, making you think differently about things you’ve seen a million times before.  More ...

Chase Twitchell discusses tensions between Zen and poetry writing in public reading

Zen is described by Merriam Webster as a Japanese form of Buddhism that emphasizes meditation. In this surface understanding, Zen seems to coincide nicely for the career of a poet. However, poet Chase Twitchell, who visited campus on Oct. 25 would disagree.  A student of Zen, Twitchell speaks to the fundamental tensions between Zen and poetry and her struggles between the two. Twitchell said, “Zen teaches that what we experience in the world is a kind of primal immediate reality that can’t be translated into words, and that words can actually get in the way of it.”  Poetry is, fundamentally, the art of words, and so Twitchell faces the dilemma of coinciding her beliefs from her Zen teachings and her profession as a published poet. “Zen teaches you to look at as something as it is,” Twitchell said when referring to her understanding of a Zen poem as one with very few metaphors and little poetic description.  More ...

New films to see this fall season

The slow period of the movie season is almost over. While the time between the summer blockbuster season and holidays can seem endless, with countless low-budget thrillers flooding theatres, higher quality films are certainly on the horizon. Although the overall number may seem fewer than last year’s deep roster, rest assured, better options await. Whether one prefers fast-paced Hollywood blockbusters or slow-burning period dramas, this season’s slate has something for everyone. With various film festivals already occurring, some of these movies have already been released. Here are a few films from three different categories to keep in mind in the upcoming months:  More ...

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